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INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH

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IJPR included in UGC-Approved List of Journals - Ref. No. is SL. No. 4812 & J. No. 63703

Published by : Advanced Scientific Research
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0975-2366
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IJPR 9[3] July - September 2017 Special Issue

July - September 9[3] 2017

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Impact of Education to General Public Knowledge, Attitude and Practices toward Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance: A Systematic Review

Author: HIDAYAH KARUNIAWATI, MOHAMED AZMI AHMAD HASSALI, SRI SURYAWATI, WAN ISMA HANISA, TAUFIK TAUFIK
Abstract: Objectives: Misuse and overuse of antibiotics in general public likely one of the contributing factors of antibiotics resistance. Various interventions have been conducted to improve rational antibiotics used in the general public. The objective of this study was to systematically review the impact of education on the general public’s knowledge, attitude, and practices towards antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. Methods: We systematically identified and review relevant literature on educational programs aimed at improving the knowledge, attitude, and practice of the general public towards antibiotics and antibiotic resistance published from 1997 to 2019. We used PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct, and Google scholar as an electronic database to identify the relevant study. Results: Of 617 articles screened, 33 studies were included (13972 participants). The most studied population was adults and parents or caregivers (each, 10 studies; 30.3%) and conducted in the USA (11; 33.3%), UK (9; 27.4%), India (4; 12.2%), Portugal (3; 9.1%), Jordan, Australia, New Zealand, Poland, France, and Malta (each 1; 3.0%). Of the 22 studies on intervention to improve knowledge, 20 (90.9%) showed a statistically significant improvement in knowledge towards antibiotics ranging from 2.5% to 34.4%. The mean of respondents’ expectation to prescribed with antibiotics for cold, flu, sore throat, and fever after intervention decreased by 11.6%. Parental demand for antibiotics reduced by 34%; antibiotics prescription declined by 27.2%; the sense of personal responsibility in tackling antibiotics resistance increased by 12.2%. Conclusions: The educational intervention could improve the general publics’ knowledge, attitude, and practices towards antibiotics and antibiotics resistance.
Keyword: knowledge, attitude, practices, antibiotic resistance, the general public
DOI: https://doi.org/10.31838/ijpr/2020.12.01.127
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0.12
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